Jellicoe Road

Hello, World!

This week, I read Melina Marchetta’s YA novel, Jellicoe Road, also known as On the Jellicoe Road in countries outside of the USA. It follows two very different stories that come together at the end to create a beautifully devastating full circle.

The main one of the two is about Taylor Markham, a girl who is abandoned by her mother and attends a boarding school where she leads one of the parties in territory wars against two other groups–the Townies and the Cadets. The leader of the Cadets is Jonah Griggs, with whom Taylor has a unique history with. Marchetta was able to make me fall in love with Jonah Griggs and make me more invested in his character than I care to admit. JUST A WARNING: There are several love stories that are being followed and each play a key role in this book, so if you’re a sucker for that kind of thing like I am, read Jellicoe Road.

There are many recurring ideas of being lost and left behind and the experience of losing others. It started off as confusing and hard to follow in terms of plot and information, but I am willing to give Marchetta the benefit of the doubt and say that perhaps, she was trying to convey the complex, lost feeling of the characters in the novel. It also struck me as one of those pieces with complicated plots that need to be read/watched multiple times (like Inception) to really answer all your questions. I have no doubt that this book will be just as amazing and brilliant the next time I read it as it did the first. I also want to point out that as the plot progressed, the middle and ending became increasingly predictable, but that was also forgivable. I loved the characters so much by then that I didn’t care.

I made the mistake of reading this book in one day (which resulted in me finishing it in pools of my own tears at around 1 AM). I woke up the next morning with the puffiest eyes EVER.

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This book is well written and an easy read if you want a good cry. This isn’t the typical cliche YA novel we’re all used to seeing. Marchetta has made a masterpiece for YA fiction and her telling of Taylor’s story is near-perfect–tragic yet not overdone with an over-dramatic plot.

See you next week,

Jeannie

P.S.- If you have any book suggestions, feel free to leave a comment!

A Thousand Splendid Suns

Dear Crystal,

First of all THANKS FOR NOT RESPONDING IT’S BEEN FOREVER. Firstly, I’m soo sorry for being MIA for so long. School is hard. Mostly bio is hard. 😦
This week I read A Thousand Splendid Suns by Khaled Hosseini. I’m going to try to make this week’s review short and sweet and mostly spoiler-free, but we’ll see how far I get with that LOL. The novel is an engaging and beautiful story about two Afghan women in different generations who struggle to find feminism, happiness, and love in the political turmoil from the 1970’s to the early 2000’s. The women, Laila and Mariam, face shocking horrors and hardships and spend their lives looking for a way to escape the oppression. Hosseini’s story is also very enlightening and educational regarding Afghanistan’s troubles during that time. Just an all-around great book.

Often times I’ll get bored by the plot of books like this. Not ONCE did I want to put the book down. A Thousand Splendid Suns is the perfect pace for someone who enjoys a surprising and fresh plot as well as phenomenal writing. I love love love this book (I mean, let’s be real here– any book that can make you sob nonstop for an hour is a good book). I finished the book ten minutes before I had to go to a class so I showed up looking something like this:

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Anyway, A Thousand Splendid Suns is a touching and devastating novel. It’s like Hosseini sat down intending to create step-by-step the saddest story for the main characters. I will grant it a 9.5 out of 10 because no one is perfect, and there’s always room for improvement. I look forward to reading The Kite Runner soon, a very very very popular book also written by Khaled Hosseini. I can’t wait!!

Love,

Jeannie